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Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Hare
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The Tetragrammaton,
Tarot Court Cards and Eliphas Levi

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Noblet Tarot Queen of Batons

Clefs Majeures et Clavicules de Salomon

In 1860, Eliphas Levi wrote a small volume in effect on tarot in which, in addition to the trumps, the pips and the court cards were attributed 'seals' and Hebrew letters or words.

At this stage I'll only briefly discuss the court cards and their respective attributions as it is all too often through that this was the invention of the Golden Dawn. As can be seen below, it's clear that the GD itself gets its view from E. Levi.

Tetragammaton

Levi has the following to say of the letters of the Tetragrammaton:

Toute la puissance est dans une seule, Jod.
Son reflet est dans une autre, Hé.
Il s'explique par la troisième, Vav.
Il se féconde par la quatrième, Hé.

  

All power is within one, Yod.
Its reflection is in another, Heh.
It explicates itself via the third, Vav.
It fecunds itself via the fourth, Heh.

Court cards and the letters

Kings:

 

 

King of Sceptre

The father

Eliphas Levi Court Card attributions

 

King of Cup

Spouse of the mother

 
 

King of Sword

Prince of love

King of Circle

Father creator

 


Queens:

 

 

Queen of Sceptre

Spouse of the father

Eliphas Levi Court Card attributions

 

Queen of Cup

Master of herself

 
 

Queen of Sword

Princess of love

Queen of Circle

Master of children

 


Cavaliers:

 

 

Cavalier of Sceptre

Conquestor of power

Eliphas Levi Court Card attributions

 

Cavalier of Cup

Conquestor of happiness

 
 

Cavalier of Sword

Conquestor of love

Cavalier of Circle

Conquestor of works

 


Valets:

 

 

Valet of Sceptre

Slave of man

Eliphas Levi Court Card attributions

 

Valet of Cup

Slave of woman

 
 

Valet of Sword

Slave of love

Valet of children

or of Circles